Smoke Damage >> How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle

The results showed that when conditions were varied, different materials tested as the most corrosive. While all materials tested had a corrosive effect on the targets, there was not a consistent pattern in the reaction of the steel coupons to the test conditions. Enhancing condensation with ice typically increased the How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle corrosion though there were exceptions. 

Heating the coupons was seen to increase corrosion with increased reactivity with oxygen reported as the main reason for the corrosion.The pre treatment as well as post treatments generally seemed to work, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle but not always. The treatments, both pre and post, seemed to work better in the heated tests than in the ambient tests.One exception was a single test with a warm exposure chamber where the pre treatment seemed to cause a ten-fold increase in corrosion. 

All cases were found to render the copper mirrors useless as conductors. At ambient conditions, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle the materials that released the most HCl caused the most corrosion. While most of the copper in the mirrors remained after the tests, pitting left the mirrors useless as conductors. Finally, Hirschler and Smith [67] showed that water condensation greatly enhances corrosion.

The significant sensitivity of corrosion to test conditions as well as the inherent corrosivity of fire effluent is a significant part of the reason for moving from indirect methods to direct methods. In 1988, Fallou [61] gave an overview of the subject and How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle a review of activities over the previous ten years that the IEC had conducted on the corrosion issue. 

According to Fallou, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle it was generally agreed that it was desirable to be able to use preliminary tests to determine which materials were usable. The hope was that with application of the science of corrosion one would be able to use the results of bench-scale tests to determine full-scale behavior without having to run the experiments. 

Fallou listed three main concerns with corrosion of electrical equipment. The first concern How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle was electrical contacts since experience in industrial atmospheres had demonstrated that even low level exposures could cause contacts to fail quickly. The second concern was the loss of metal conductor in circuits causing the circuit to fail. 

Thirdly, impact of corrosives on insulators which can lead to bridging or short circuits was a concern.In 1988, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle Briggs [92] reported on the status of the actual tests under development for three properties of smoke, density, toxicity and corrosivity. His main focus was on smoke density and smoke toxicity. 

He reports that the interests of the ISO/TC61/SC4/WG2 group were mainly in understanding the decomposition models, condensation techniques and corrosion detectors. At that time, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle the fire tests being considered were a Japanese system, DP5659, for measuring smoke density and the traveling furnace in DIN 53436. 

No specifics were offered on the work on exposure chambers. Finally, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle initial work on a corrosion probe would use the CNET probe. Hirschler gave a summary of the state of understanding of smoke corrosivity at the 1990 International Wire & Cable Symposium [93]. He compared the results of two acid gas tests, the hot tube furnace used by the Canandian Standards Association and the "coil" test with the CNET probe. 

He noted that the acid gas tests give virtually identical results and How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle that the CNET results"parallels" the acid gas results. He suggested that this is because the CNET test forced condensation, with no post exposure period and an unrealistically intense fire model. While the CNET results have the same trend as the acid gas tests, the results do not parallel the acid gas test results.

Hirschler reviewed his and Smith's work [67] described earlier, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle putting significant focus on the impact of heat on corrosion. He notes how heating the steel coupon to 550 C (1022 F) in a moist environment with the air heated to 100 C (212 F) to 110 C (230 F) causes a significant and relatively consistent level of corrosion. 

While the results are significant, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle it is not clear how realistic the scenario actually is. Hirschler notes that chlorine-generating materials are more corrosive in the cooler environment, possibly due to condensation. He also points out that nylon's increased corrosivity in the warmer environment didn't have an obvious explanation.

As the first of the direct test methods, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle the CNET test is a benchmark used for comparison of other tests. Bottin showed that the CNET method was an appropriate method to measure corrosivity of fire effluent [72, 94]. As part of the testing, Bottin compared the results of the CNET test to the conductivity of seven samples that were tested. 

The two samples containing fluorine were not tested for conductivity, but for the other five samples, only one product failed to rank the same for both tests, a flame retarded compound containing decabromodiphenyloxide.As can be seen in Figure 12, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle the four materials that did rank the same in both tests seem to be almost perfectly exponentially correlated.

In 1991, Briggs [69] reviewed IEC 754-1 and IEC 754-2, which were standards at the time, as well as the traveling furnace and radiant panel tests, which were both in a development phase.The traveling furnace became IEC 754-3. The cone corrosimeter, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle which became IEC 754-4, is not reviewed. He discussed the concerns with corrosion testing at the time, which have largely remained unchanged, but didn't review any data, old or new. 

He concluded that adequate testing methods had not yet been developed. Hirschler studied the available test data for smoke corrosion tests [95 - 97]. He described the CNET test, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle ASTM E05.21.71 draft radiant panel test, ASTM D09.21.4 cone corrosimeter in draft form and the DIN 53463 traveling furnace. 

He included all the tests that he reviewed in more detail in International Wire & Cable Symposium paper [93]. Added to this paper is a review of the ASTM E05.21.71 task force requirements with recommendations for two additional requirements 4:11. Test should be repeatable and How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle reproducible 12. Test results should correlate validly with those obtained from corrosion following full scale fires.

He later looked at the four corrosion test methods of the time and How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle considered how they performed compared to the requirements. He found the indirect tests do not meet most of the criteria. Hirschler thought that most of the problems with the CNET test can be easily resolved but the main problem is repeat ability. 

Basically, there is not much information on the other tests.He reported that the DIN traveling furnace test was not defined well enough to evaluate although he stated, "the combustion module of this test is, however, generally considered as unrepresentative of real fire conditions, How To Remove Soot From A Painted Mantle meaning criteria 2 would not be met". He deemed the radiant panel and cone corrosimeter tests to meet criteria 1 to 7, but neither address criteria 8, 11 and 12.

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