Odor Control >> Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire

During the second pass, when all demolition had ceased, reconstruction of damaged areas of the building by the construction trades began. Meanwhile, the cleaners carried out a thorough washing and scrubbing of all areas, using cleaning materials designed for fire-damaged buildings. For nonporous surfaces, they used strong detergents in water, Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire primarily a product called GP-2000. 

Soot-removal sponges were dragged across porous sooty surfaces such as wood and unpainted drywall; Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire soot was absorbed into the rubber sponges and rolled off with the crumbs. The next step in the process was to apply sealant to areas such as ductwork, crawl spaces, and drywall that could not be cleaned or could be only partially cleaned. 

All of these surfaces received a spray coat of a heavy-bodied oil paint, brand name Kilz, Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire to seal in soot particles and soot smell (fig. 4). The application of this sealant preceded any painting and finishing work. Following the application of this sealant, the walls were painted and new ceilings, carpets, and floors were installed. 

The last cleaning pass involved a thorough cleaning and polishing. After a final inspection, the building was turned over to museum staff for reoccupancy. By May 28, 1990, Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire the reconstruction and cleaning of the building were completed; on June 23, four months and seven days after the fire, one of the four gallery spaces in the museum was opened to the public.2.2 2.2 

RECOVERY OF MUSEUM EXHIBITS AND PROGRAMS Following the fire at the RSM, the museum building was boarded up and "out of business.” The administrative, education, Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire and gift shop staff were relocated to other buildings. Staff members moved off-site, and their projects came to a virtual standstill until files and computers were cleaned and returned to them. 

They did not return to their offices until nine weeks later. Regular administrative and Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire management activities, including a proposal to the government for museum redevelopment, were shelved to undertake the imperative demands of the fire recovery. The two-week response period immediately following the fire was one of heightened emotions and rushed meetings. 

It was decided that all artifacts would have to stay in the building during the recovery because it would be impossible to move them before the building cleaning company moved in. The artifacts on display were deemed immobile because they were large, Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire semipermanently mounted, or enclosed within display cases. 

Museum staff and volunteers did, however, move all administration and program contents (files, educational material, resource library, etc.) to off-site storage areas for further cleaning. Within the first week following the fire,  Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire these items were quickly packed into boxes that were stacked by the hundreds on shelves hastily erected in the museum hallways; later the boxes were removed by a moving company to temporary offices and warehouses. 

In some cases, staff members cleaned soot from their own files an Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire administrative materials, a task that took a significant amount of time from their schedules. Due to a lack of funds for recovery, some files and other administrative material could not be cleaned and were discarded.The museum administration was completely unprepared for the emergency and did not have a disaster plan. 

The areas of communications, hiring, and large budget expenditures were normally managed by other government departments, and the wheels of bureaucracy turned slowly in these vital areas. Without the benefit of a disaster plan, Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire which would have outlined a plan and personnel for communications, the museum was unable to implement any effective communications measures.

The gift shop inventory was badly damaged, and most of it was discarded. Gift shop staff and Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire volunteers spent the recovery time restocking the gift shop and directing the restoration of the gift shop areas. Education staff members were forced to cancel educational programming well past the time that the museum reopened, as they awaited first the restoration of the educational rooms and then the cleaning of the educational materials (deaccessioned artifacts and teaching aids). 

With the aid of volunteer docents, the education department was able to take a modified education program into local schools. Educational programming in the museum itself did not resume until seven months after the fire.The museum management and Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire curatorial staff devoted an enormous amount of time investigating the building's architectural and design features for rehabilitation of the building and attending meetings with government officials. 

The exhibit staff, and to a lesser extent the curatorial staff, had to fit previously planned projects around the work of rehabilitating the museum's exhibits. Exhibit staff disassembled and reassembled dioramas and displays for cleaning in the sooty Earth Sciences Gallery and Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire researched the materials required for restoring the gallery area (paint colors, carpets, lighting, etc.). 

Large areas of the First Nations Gallery required redesign and reconstruction by the exhibit staff. Gallery redevelopment schedules were extended because staff members were not only required to redevelop existing exhibits but also lost the ability to work on regularly scheduled gallery redevelopment projects. The government offered the museum very little in the way of new money for recovery, and Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire its position was reflected in diminished funds for the museum's gallery redevelopment and further delays in the redevelopment schedule. 

The Life Sciences Gallery, the last gallery to be restored after the fire, is currently being redeveloped and Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire is expected to reopen in 2001.The museum was self-insured by the government and therefore was responsible for recovery of the collection, educational materials, and displays. 

The museum could not afford to hire a commercial cleaning company to clean noncollection museum material (such as replicas, dioramas, and Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire display material), leaving the staff conservators with responsibility for cleaning this material as well as the collection. 

Although the cleaning of noncollection materials was an enormous task, it provided an opportunity for the conservators to develop procedures for soot removal that could be used for cleaning the collection later in the recovery phase. Before the building cleaners undertook their first pass, Remove A Smoke Smell After A Fire they were asked to complete the first and second cleaning passes in the washrooms and in three rooms that could be used as "clean rooms” for the museum's recovery activities.

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