Animal Damage >> Animal Damage Control

To be eligible for the State Wildlife Grants (SWG) Program each state was required to develop a Wildlife Action Plan (WAP) and submit it to the National Advisory Acceptance Team (composed of staff from the states and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) by October 2005. Each Plan was required to include eight elements (see link below) that detail the species and habitats covered, the conservation actions proposed, procedures to review the Plan, and Animal Damage Control coordination with the public and other agencies. In Louisiana, the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) was charged with completing the WAP. Development of the WAP was coordinated with other state agencies, federal agencies, conservation groups, universities, industry, and the general public.

The goal of LDWF was to develop a strategy which reflected the knowledge and expertise of stakeholders throughout the state who understood the threats facing the diverse fish and wildlife species of Louisiana.The Louisiana WAP was approved in December 2005 and became the roadmap for the utilization of SWG funds. The Louisiana Wildlife Action Plan was intended to be a living document that would change as conservation priorities shift or as new threats to Louisiana’s wildlife are identified. It should be noted that the WAP is not a regulatory document, a land use Animal Damage Control plan, a land acquisition plan, or a threatened/endangered species plan.The Louisiana WAP identifies 240 species of concern, and details threats to these species, as well as strategies for conserving them.

Additionally, the WAP provides detailed information on 38 terrestrial habitats, 12 aquatic basins, and 5 marine habitats that are critical to the conservation of the species of concern identified in the WAP. Threats to each of these habitats are discussed, and conservation strategies are presentedTo ensure that the WAP remains relevant, it must be fully reviewed and revised every 10 years. The first review and Animal Damage Control revision of the Louisiana WAP must be completed by December 2015, and this effort is currently underway.To learn more about the Louisiana Wildlife Action Plan and to download a PDF of the plan please see the link below. If you would like more information about the Louisiana WAP, or about the revision that is currently underway, please contact SWG Coordinator Sam Holcomb (sholcomb@wlf.la.gov).

The State and Tribal Wildlife Grants (SWG) Program was created by federal legislation in November 2001. The SWG program was established "for the development and implementation of programs for the benefit of wildlife and their habitat, including species that are not hunted or fished”, with the goal of preventing species from being federally listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The inclusion of species that are not hunted or fished is one crucial aspect of the SWG program, as many of these species previously had no existing source of Animal Damage Control funding. In fact, the SWG program has now become the primary federal funding source for non-game conservation nationwide. Another crucial aspect of the SWG program is the focus on proactive conservation measures designed to preclude future ESA listings.

This is important, as conservation is often more effective and Animal Damage Control efficient before species undergo declines sufficient to warrant ESA action.Congress stipulated that each state fish and wildlife agency that wished to participate in the SWG program develop a Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy. In response, LDWF developed a comprehensive planning document to establish conservation needs and guide the use of SWG grant funds for the next 10 years. This document, known as the Wildlife Action Plan (WAP), was submitted for approval to the National Advisory Acceptance Team in October 2005 and subsequently approved in December.

The WAP is the roadmap for non-game conservation in Louisiana, and must be reviewed and revised every ten years to insure that it remains an effective tool for conservation planning and implementation. For more Animal Damage Control information see the Louisiana Wildlife Action Plan page.The SWG program is funded by annual Congressional appropriations. The United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) apportions these funds to state fish and wildlife agencies based on the land area and population of each state. Since the inception of the SWG program, the state of Louisiana has received $10,678,752 in federal SWG funding, with an apportionment of $708,882 in fiscal year 2011-2012. State Wildlife Grants can be for either implementation of the WAP, or for planning purposes.

Planning grants must directly support efforts to modify, revise, or update the WAP; implementation grants encompass all other eligible activities, including the collection of biological data to support planning efforts.Louisiana has funded 106 projects through the State Wildlife Grants program to date. Funded SWG projects have included biological inventories, ecological research projects, habitat assessment, habitat management, and the development and maintenance of Animal Damage Control databases. A wide range of species have benefited from SWG funding in Louisiana, including the Louisiana Black Bear, Bald Eagle, Whooping Crane, Swallow-Tailed Kite, Alligator Snapping Turtle, Mississippi Diamondbacked Terrapin, Calcasieu Painted Crawfish, Louisiana Pearlshell Mussel, and Painted Bunting.

For more information on completed and ongoing grants see the Louisiana State Wildlife Grant Projects page.State Wildlife Grant proposals are accepted by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) on an annual basis in the spring, and include Animal Damage Control projects developed by LDWF personnel, non-governmental organizations, and universities. State Wildlife Grant proposals are reviewed by LDWF's SWG Committee, consisting of 17 biologists, including representatives from both the Office of Wildlife and Office of Fisheries.For more information about the State Wildlife Grants Program in Louisiana, contact SWG Coordinator Sam Holcomb (sholcomb@wlf.la.gov).

Recover Documents From Smoke Damage

Because refrigeration may cause the paste to lose its tack, keep it at room temperature. It is best to make small batches, since the paste does not usually keep for more than a week. A preservative can be added, Document restoration Recover Documents From Smoke Damage but these chemicals are toxic and not recommended.

Microwave Wheat   read more..

Tree Damage Cleanup Hints From Wind

The winds that blew throughout the state Wednesday night brought down approximately 300-400 trees in the Mammoth Lakes Basin. Most of the trees were located in the vicinity of the Mammoth Lakes Pack Station. Many of the uprooted trees have not completely fallen to the ground, but rather are leaning   read more..

Mold Cause Problems With Allergies

Though disseminated coccidioidomycosis is uncommon, and symptomatic coccidioidal pneumonia usually resolves without therapy, many of these patients are very ill for weeks to months. Galgiani reported that a group of college students in Tucson who had coccidioidomycosis required an average of six cli  read more..

Clean Your Things Of Smoke And Soot After A House

The department’sReadyCampaign, AARP, Red Cross and NOD developed two new brochures highlighting the key preparedness steps older and disabled Americans and their families and Fire Damage Clean Your Things Of Smoke And Soot After A House caretakers should take before emergencies occur.

The NFPA also announced its newEmergency Evacuat  read more..

Sewer Odor In The Home

Sewer Gas Odors Property owners should check for and secure any open plumbing waste lines they may have before a problem occurs.Sewer gas could be flammable, displace oxygen or contain toxic materials that should not be inhaled and could be a serious threat to life and health. Wastewaters contain sm  read more..

How To Clean After A Demolition

This plan has been developed to provide the framework for County government and other entities to clear and remove debris generated by a natural or human made event. This Debris Management Plan focuses on the types of activities that are likely to be required during a disruption or emergency, withou  read more..

White Mold In Basement

White Mold in basement Q. If I’m concerned about biological contaminants in my home, what can I do to deal with the problem? There are no practical tests for biological contaminants for use by non-professionals. However there are signs to watch for. You can sometimes see and Basement Drying White Mold In Basement smell   read more..

Carpet Cleaning Solutions

The purpose of this bulletin is to provide claims guidance regarding coverage for structural drying under the Standard Flood Insurance Policy (SFIP). This paper assumes some knowledge on the part of the reader, but reference to the glossary and other addenda can be helpful. The SFIP pays the cost to  read more..

Contracting FEMA For Debris Removal

A subgrant will be prepared at the appropriate cost share to reflect the amount of debris removal work completed during each operational time frame. If the Subgrantee agrees to this alternative procedure, no costs associated with debris removal that occur after 180 days from the start ofthe inc  read more..

How To Remove Flood Damage Debris In An Emergency

Debris estimating, assessing the total volume of debris that has to be dealt with before it is actually collected, is an art and science that is still developing. Results have been mixed, however. Officials in one county said while they had received an estimate of 100 tons of vegetative de  read more..