Debris Removal >> Recycle

What happens to the things you throw away? If you dispose of them in the trash, your old stuff will probably end up sitting in a landfill. But if you Recycle, the materials you got rid of yesterday could end up back on a store's shelf in the future. Recycle is the practice of reusing materials in existing products to create new ones. 

This can be accomplished in expected ways such as using Recycle paper as packaging material or unexpected ways such as using recycle glass to make artificial turf. Recycle helps to conserve limited resources, andits proponents argueit has other environmental benefits as well. 

For example, reusing existing materials means that fewer new ones have to be produced, which can lower factory emissions, reduce the need for new natural resources, and lower dependence on landfills. Many different kinds of materials are Recycle. Some materials, including plastic, metal, glass, and paper, are commonly recycle. 

Disposing of these recycle materials is relatively easythey can be deposited for pickup or dropped off at recycle centers. Specialized electronics, such as laptops or cell phones, are also recycle but require special handling because of the potentially dangerous chemicals contained in their batteries. 

Recycle has become an increasingly important issue in the United States as both the population and the amount of waste each person generates continue to increase. Municipal solid waste (MSW) includes items that are normally thrown in the trash, such as food packaging or scraps, old furniture, tires, or yard clippings. 

According to a study by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), municipal solid waste generation increased from 2.68 to 4.34 pounds per person per day between 1960 and 2009. Collectively, Recycle Americans generated about 243 million tons of MSW in 2009.[1] (See chart 1.) 

Over the last several years, however, municipal solid waste generation has decreased, apparently a result of the recent economic recession in the United States Although overall waste generation has increased, recycle has also become more widely practiced. In 2009, about 61 million tonsor 25 percent of the MSWwas recovered through Recycle. 

In 1960, Americans recycle 6.4 percent of their waste.[4] Recycle has grown as more communities, recognizing the environmental benefits, have made collecting recycles commonplace. Businesses that use recycles as raw materials and Recycle an educated public that values recycle products have also contributed to the growth of recycle. 

Recycle is more common in some regions of the United States, especially the West Coast and Northeast. In addition to recycle, some areas practice other methods of waste management, including composting, putting the waste into landfills, or burning waste to produce energy. This report provides information on various career opportunities in the recycle industry. 

The first two sections provide an overview of the industry. The third section details a number of occupations involved in collecting and processing Recycle. For each of these occupations, it provides a description of the job duties, the credentials required (e.g., education, training and licensure), and information on wages. 

It's no small task to get recycles back to manufacturers, where they can be reused in new products. The recycles have to be collected from many sources, including households, businesses, and construction sites. Collectively, these sources are referred to as consumers of Recycle services. 

The recycles that consumers produce are collected and transported to a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), where they are sorted and processed, before being sent to manufacturers. In some areas, Recycle people have to sort their own recycles before they can be collected. For example, aluminum cans and newspapers are placed into different bins and collected separately. 

Increasingly, however, recycle is becoming "single-stream," which means that all Recycle are collected together. The different types are then sorted later. There are several different methods of collection. The three most common are curbside pickup, drop-off centers, and deposit systems. 

In areas with curbside pickup, consumers treat their recycles much as they do traditional waste. They place recycles in a bin issued by their local government or a private company. This bin is placed near the curb of the street on a designated day or days of the week, and Recycle workers empty the bins into a truck that transports the recycles to an MRF. 

Curbside pickup has grown more prominent as single-stream recycle has become more common. In 2009, Recycle more than 9,000 curbside pickup programs were reported in the United States. An American Beverage Association study estimated that 74 percent of the United States population had access to curbside pickup programs in 2009. 

As an alternative or supplement to curbside pickup programs, drop-off recycle centers are also very widely used. Consumers are responsible for transporting and depositing their own recycles at drop-off centers. These Recycle are collected regularly and taken to an MRF. Drop-off centers are popular because they are cheaper than providing curbside pickup. 

The American Beverage Association study estimated that 83 percent of the United States population had access to drop-off Recycle centers. However, drop-off centers also fail to return as many recycles as curbside pickup programs. Many communities have both curbside pickup and drop-off centers. 

Deposit systems, found only in some states, provide consumers with a financial reason to recycle. When consumers bring certain Recycle, such as glass bottles or aluminum cans, to specified locations for collection, they are given a small amount of money in return. 

Recycles that can earn money from deposit systems are marked with the state's abbreviation and the amount of money it is worth. The money consumers earn through deposit systems comes from their own wallets. For example, Recycle in some states an empty glass bottle might earn 5 cents. 

Those 5 cents are added to the cost of a bottle when it is purchased. Consumers are depositing money when they purchase a recycle item; they receive their money back when they Recycle it.

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