Wind Damage >> Hurricane Proof Your House

Double Entry Doors Double-wide garage doors Double-wide (two-car) garage doors can pose a problem during hurricanes because they are so large that they wobble as the high winds blow and can pull out of their tracks or collapse from Hurricane Proof Your House wind pressure. 

If garage doors fail, high winds can enter your home through the garage and blow out doors, windows, walls, and even the roof. Figure 6. Double-Wide Garage Doors Certain parts Hurricane Proof Your House of the country have building codes requiring garage doors to withstand high winds. 

You should check with your local government building officials to see if there are code requirements for garage doors in your area. Some garage doors can be strengthened with Hurricane Proof Your House retrofit kits. Check with your local building supplies retailer to see if a retrofit kit is available for your garage door. You can expect to pay from $70 to $150 to retrofit your garage door. 

Many garage doors can be reinforced at their weakest points. Retrofitting your garage doors involves installing horizontal bracing onto each panel. This horizontal bracing can Hurricane Proof Your House be part of a kit from the garage door manufacturer. You may also need heavier hinges and stronger center supports and end supports for your door (see Figure 6). 

Check the track on your garage door. With both hands, grab a section of each track and see if it is loose or if it can be twisted. If so, Hurricane Proof Your House a stronger track should be installed. Make sure that it is anchored to the 2´ 4s inside the wall with heavy wood bolts or properly attached to masonry with expansion bolts (see Figure 7). Figure 

Garage Door Track Anchoring After you have retrofitted your door, it may not be balanced. To check, Hurricane Proof Your House lower the door about halfway and let go. If it goes up or down, the springs will need adjusting. The springs are dangerous and should be adjusted by a professional. 

If you are unable to retrofit your door, you can purchase specially reinforced garage doors Hurricane Proof Your House designed to withstand winds of up to 120 miles per hour. These doors can cost from $400 to $450 (excluding labor) and should be installed by a professional. 

Storm shutters Installing storm shutters over all exposed windows and other glass surfaces is one of the easiest and Hurricane Proof Your House most effective ways to protect your home. You should cover all windows, French doors, sliding glass doors, and skylights. 

There are many types of manufactured storm shutters available. For more information Hurricane Proof Your House on manufactured shutters, check with your local building supplies retailer. If you install manufactured shutters, follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully. 

Before installing shutters, check with your local building official to find out if a building Hurricane Proof Your House permit is required. It is important that you have your shut ters ready now, and that you mark and store them so they can be easily installed during a hurricane watch. 

Plywood shutters that you make yourself, if installed properly, can offer a high level of protection from flying debris during a hurricane. Plywood shutters can be Hurricane Proof Your House installed on all types of homes. Measure each window and each door that has glass, and add 8 inches to both the height and width to provide a 4-inch overlap on each side of the window or door. 

Sheets of plywood are gener ally 4´ 8 feet. Tell your local building supply retail er the size and number of openings you need to cover to determine how many sheets to buy. To install Hurricane Proof Your House plywood shutters you will need bolts, wood or masonry anchors, large washers, and 5/8 inch exterior-grade plywood. 

For windows 3 feet by 4 feet or smaller installed on a wood frame house, use 1/4-inch lag bolts and plastic-coated permanent anchors. The lag bolts should penetrate the wall and frame surrounding the window at least 1 3/4 inches. For larger windows, Hurricane Proof Your House use 3/8-inch lag bolts that penetrate the wall and frame surrounding the window at least 2 1/2 inches. 

For windows 3 feet by 4 feet or smaller installed on a masonry house, Hurricane Proof Your House use 1/4-inch expansion bolts and galvanized permanent expansion anchors. The expansion bolt should penetrate the wall at least 1 1/2 inches. For larger windows, use 3/8-inch expansion bolts that penetrate the wall at least 1 1/2 inches. 

The tools you will need are a circular or hand saw, a drill with the appropriately sized bits, Hurricane Proof Your House a hammer, and a wrench to fit the bolts. To be safe, use eye protection and work gloves. 4 Cut the plywood to the measurements for each opening. Drill holes 2 1/2 inches from the outside edge of the plywood at each corner and at 12-inch intervals. 

Drill four holes in the center area of the plywood to relieve pressure during a hurricane. Figure 8. Plywood Storm Shutters Place the plywood over the opening and mark each hole position on the outside wall (see Figure 8). Drill holes with the appropriate size and type of bit for the anchors. Install the anchors, Hurricane Proof Your House the plywood, and the bolts to make sure they fit properly. 

On wood-frame houses, make sure that the anchors are secured into the solid wood that frames the door or window and not into the siding or trim. Mark each shutter so you will know where it is to be installed and store them and the bolts in an accessible place. If the opening is larger than one sheet of plywood, Hurricane Proof Your House you will need to make shutters with 2´ 4 bracing. 

This bracing can be two 2´ 4s at the middle and bottom of the two sheets of plywood, Hurricane Proof Your House evenly spaced, with the 2-inch side attached to the inside of the storm shutter (see Figure 9). Attach the 2´ 4s to the outside of the storm shutter with 2-inch, 10-gauge wood screws before installing the shutter. 

Large Plywood Storm Shutters The recommendations in this brochure are not intended to replace local building code requirements or Hurricane Proof Your House to serve as the only options for protecting your home from hurricane wind damage.

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