Debris Removal >> Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm

FEMA did not approve debris plans that did not identify a DMS or disposal site. As mentioned previously, FEMA is considering revisions to its regulations to incorporate the increased federal share component of the PA Pilot Program, which would require PA applicants to identify DMS and Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm final disposal sites in their debris management plans.  

Allow qualified states that have completed their own plan to approve local jurisdictions' debris disposal plans. FEMA is considering this part of the Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm recommendation. FEMA encourages states to promote the development and maintenance of local debris management plans. 

As part of our considerations to revise FEMA regulations to incorporate the increased federal share component of the PA Pilot Program, Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm FEMA will consider a significant role for states in the review and approval of debris management plans. 

Recommendation #2: To the greatest extent possible, provide applicants, FEMA employees, and other appropriate officials clear and unambiguous rules, guidance, Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm and procedures for debris operations, including checklists and sample contracts. FEMA concurs with this recommendation with the caveat below. 

FEMA has provided, and will continue to provide, debris operations guidance to FEMA PA staff, to Grantees, to applicants, Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm and to the general public. This includes the Debris Management Guide (FEMA 325), which is currently under review to ensure that this guidance remains current, comprehensive, and incorporates lessons learned. 

FEMA is providing additional guidance on debris estimating and Appendix B Management Comments to the Draft Report FEMA’s Oversight and Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm Management of Debris Removal Operations Page 39 monitoring in the Debris Estimating Field Guide (FEMA 329) and the Debris Monitoring Guide (FEMA 327) both of which were issued in December 2010. 

FEMA also performs regular periodic reviews of all PA policies and guidance to ensure that they are up to date, accurate, and appropriately address current policy issues. FEMA does not agree, however, Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm that providing sample contracts is appropriate. Applicants are responsible for procuring debris contracts and FEMA is not a party to those contracts. 

By providing sample contracts, FEMA may create a false expectation of reimbursement of costs even if applicants fail to follow competitive bidding procedures, the work performed is ineligible, Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm or the contract is not monitored effectively. In addition, FEMA cannot account for the varying procurement requirements among states and localities. 

FEMA provides PA applicants guidance on contract procurement in Recovery Fact Sheet 9580.201, Debris Contracting Guidance. This Fact Sheet includes recommended provisions for debris removal and debris monitoring contracts, Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm includes a standard bid sheet, and includes guidance on evaluating proposed equipment and labor rates. 

Additionally, FEMA reviews proposed debris contracts for PA applicants, upon request. Recommendation #3: Work with the states to provide a variety of readily accessible training concerning rules, guidance, procedures, and recent developments in debris removal, contracting, Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm and cost containment. FEMA concurs with this recommendation. 

FEMA currently has, and will continue to make, debris training available through the Emergency Management Institute (EMI), FEMA Regional Offices, and online. Current debris courses include the week long "Debris Management" (E202) course at EMI, a one-day Debris Management Plan Development course conducted throughout the Nation upon request, Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm and the Independent Study Course "Introduction to Debris Operations in FEMA's Public Assistance Program" available on CD-ROM. 

FEMA is currently developing a computer-based training course on debris management plan development. States may request additional Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm training through their respective FEMA Regional Offices. Recommendation #4: Provide force account labor reimbursement to cover local governments' costs of employing workers to monitor debris collections and to remove leaning trees and hanging branches, and encourage them to undertake such responsibilities. 

FEMA concurs with this recommendation. FEMA encourages PA applicants to use force account labor to conduct their debris removal operations. FEMA currently reimburses PA applicants for force account overtime hours. FEMA also reimburses applicants for the use of Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm equipment. Current FEMA regulations do not authorize the PA Program to reimburse force account straight time hours. 

Under the PA Pilot Program, FEMA had the authority to fund an applicant's force account straight time for debris removal operations. FEMA is considering Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm revisions to its regulations that would incorporate the force account straight time reimbursement component of the PA Pilot Program. Recommendation #5: Strengthen the requirements involved in monitoring contracts to ensure that no relationships exist between debris collection contractors and monitoring 

Management Comments to the Draft Report FEMA’s Oversight and Management of Debris Removal Operations Page 40 contractors, and that monitors are properly trained and Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm capable of independent and accurate performance. FEMA concurs with this recommendation. FEMA updated its debris contracting guidance in the September 27,2010 Recovery Fact Sheet 9580.201, Debris Contracting Guidance. 

The Debris Monitoring Guide (FEMA 327) also provides applicants with monitoring guidance. Both Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm documents stress that debris monitors should not have a relationship with debris removal contractors. Upon request from states, FEMA will provide debris monitoring training as part of the technical assistance that FEMA offersto PA applicants. 

Recommendation #6: Explore advanced technologies to supplement monitoring staff such as GPS in trucks or Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm surveillance cameras. FEMA concurs with the recommendation in that FEMA supports applicants' use of relevant technology to improve their monitoring operations and may provide reimbursement for utilizing such technologies. 

However, debris monitoring is the primary responsibility of PA applicants. FEMA does not concur with the recommendation to the extent that FEMA is not a party to contracts between applicants and Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm contractors, and cannot require the use of advance technology as monitoring tools. 

FEMA stays abreast of current technologies in order to provide appropriate technical assistance to Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm applicants when they are considering technology applications as a part of their monitoring operation. Recommendation #7: Assess weight-based rather than volume-based payment for debris collection and investigate whether such systems could be efficiently linked to debris payment accounting systems. 

FEMA generally concurs with the recommendation, Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm as FEMA currently accepts the use of weight-based systems as a basis for reimbursement. FEMA acknowledges that weight-based monitoring and payment systems have some advantages over volume-based systems. However, as stated in the draft report, weight based systems are not immune from potential waste, fraud, or abuse and both weight-based and volume-based systems require proper monitoring and oversight to be effective. 

FEMA can provide funding for the use of temporary scales during debris operations and Garbage Cleanup From Wind Storm encourages applicants to utilize such systems where appropriate. Recommendation #8: Modify disaster assistance employee deployment processes to ensure that Incident Management Assistance Teams and other FEMA first responders include one or more debris specialists with the experience and management skills to assist communities in the crucial early stages of planning and implementing debris removal activities.

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