Debris Removal >> Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds

Modify disaster assistance employee deployment processes to ensure that Incident Management Assistance Teams and other FEMA first responders include one or more debris specialists with the experience and management skills to assist communities in the crucial early stages of planning and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds implementing debris removal activities. 

FEMA's Oversight and Management of Debris Removal Operations Page 34 Recommendation #9: Continue to refine cost data to determine whether having qualified FEMA or local personnel present in all debris towers, major staging areas, and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds on the ground as roving monitors during significant debris-generating events would be cost-effective. 

Recommendation #10: Develop a performance measurement that FEMA headquarters and regional personnel can use to measure, analyze, and improve debris program performance. This should be designed for easy analysis of cost and performance data across regions, disasters, and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds contractors. 

Management Comments and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds OIG Analysis FEMA generally concurs with Recommendations #8 and #10 but does not concur with Recommendation #9. FEMA supports the intent of Recommendation #8 but believes the way to address this issue is to ensure that there are adequate numbers of experienced employees in the disaster workforce, rather than modifying the deployment process. 

FEMA will continue its efforts to increase the size of its resource pool and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds speed the deployment of technical expertise to support applicants during the early stages of planning and implementation of debris removal operations. With regard to Recommendation #9, FEMA considers its current monitoring program to be the most prudent use of FEMA's resources and taxpayer dollars and believes it avoids unnecessary duplication of effort. 

Due to applicants using different monitoring strategies, FEMA believes it is difficult to determine the cost savings and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds would likely prevent the performance of a conclusive analysis of the cost-effectiveness of an increased monitoring presence as compared to FEMA's current approach. 

For Recommendation #10, FEMA agrees with the need to develop a performance measurement system, with cost and performance data, to measure, analyze and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds improve debris program performance. FEMA is currently developing a Quality Assurance/Quality Control tool that provides a framework to measure quality and performance throughout the entire PA program. 

In addition, FEMA has worked to improve debris estimating and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds to develop automated or digital systems that will improve the collection of debris data in the field. FEMA is currently working to develop a cost database of unit price debris FEMA's Oversight and Management of Debris Removal Operations Page 35 removal costs to assist PA staff and applicants when determining whether or not a cost is reasonable. 

We agree with the actions FEMA has taken and is taking to develop performance measurement systems including usable cost and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds performance data as recommended in Recommendation #10. We believe such a refinement of cost data should eventually result in systems that allow enhanced decision-making such as the assessment of whether increased monitors would be cost-effective as recommended in Recommendation #9. 

FEMA officials would then have a sound basis for asserting that their current monitoring practice is the most prudent use of FEMA's resources and taxpayer dollars or Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds whether increased (or reduced) monitoring might be more fiscally sound. 

While we agree that FEMA should continue efforts to have adequate numbers of skilled and experienced employees in the disaster workforce, we believe there is a clear need for the deployment process to be adjusted to ensure that FEMA early responders include individuals with adequate experience and management skills to assist communities in the crucial early stages of planning and implementing debris removal activities, Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds as is recommended in Recommendation #8. 

We will determine the status of these recommendations once we receive the detailed corrective action plan in FEMA's 90 day letter. FEMA's Oversight and Management of Debris Removal Operations Page 36 Appendix A Purpose, Scope, and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds Methodology The purpose of this review was to determine whether opportunities exist to improve FEMA's management and oversight of debris removal operations following major disasters. 

Specific areas we examined included regional, state, and local debris planning; contractor selection, utilization, and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds management; debris removal and disposal operations; debris-monitoring operations; and general program management and reporting functions. 

We interviewed officials from FEMA headquarters, 10 FEMA regions, 10 states and 5 municipalities that had recently experienced a major debris-generating event, Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds other federal organizations, public policy organizations, and academia. We reviewed all GAO and OIG reports issued in the past 5 years for audits and reviews that included debris management within their scopes of work. 

We conducted fieldwork in the District of Columbia and Tennessee. We judgmentally selected Tennessee to review debris activities related to flooding in Nashville and other areas in central and western Tennessee. The May 3–5, 2010, Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds Nashville flooding (FEMA DR-1909 TN) was the largest debris event during the time we were conducting fieldwork. 

We researched federal laws, regulations, policies, guidance, published reports, and other information related to FEMA's Public Assistance program with an emphasis on Category A debris removal eligibility and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds costs. We conducted our review under the authority of the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, and according to the Quality Standards for Inspections issued by the President's Council on Integrity and Efficiency (now the Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency) 

The OIG makes II recommendations in its draft report. FEMA's responses to those recommendations follow: Recommendation #1: Provide a provision of an additional S% federal cost share, not to exceed 100%, to applicants with a FEMA-approved debris management plan and at least two prequalified debris and Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds wreckage removal contractors identified prior to a disaster. 

FEMA concurs with this part of the recommendation. However, Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds current FEMA regulations do not authorize the PA Program to provide applicants with an increased federal share above the established cost share for each disaster declaration. FEMA is considering revisions to its regulations that would incorporate the increased federal share initiative implemented as part of the PA Pilot Program. 

Require disposal site identification to be part of the debris management plan. FEMA concurs with this part of the recommendation. FEMA's Debris Management Guide (FEMA 325), Debris Disposal From Hurricane Winds and its debris training courses stress the importance of disposal site selection as part of debris management planning. During the PA Pilot Program, FEMA required PA applicants to identify debris management sites (DMS) and final disposal sites in order to receive the increased federal share.

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