Asbestos Abatement >> Asbestos Cancer

Abstract The most recent update of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) health assessment document for asbestos (Nicholson, 1986, referred to as Asbestos Cancer "the EPA 1986 update") is now 20 years old. 

That document contains estimates of "potency factors" for asbestos in causing lung cancer (K(L)'s) and Asbestos Cancer mesothelioma (K(M)'s) derived by fitting mathematical models to data from studies of occupational cohorts. The present paper provides a parallel analysis that incorporates data from studies published since the EPA 1986 update. 

The EPA lung cancer model assumes that the relative risk varies linearly with cumulative exposure lagged 10 years. This implies that the relative Asbestos Cancer risk remains constant after 10 years from last exposure. 

The EPA mesothelioma model predicts that the mortality rate from mesothelioma increases linearly with the intensity of exposure and, for a given intensity, increases indefinitely after exposure ceases, Asbestos Cancer approximately as the square of time since first exposure lagged 10 years. 

These assumptions were evaluated using raw data from cohorts where exposures were principally to chrysotile; mesothelioma only data from Quebec miners and millers, and crocidolite (Wittenoom Gorge, Australia miners and millers, and Asbestos Cancer using published data from a cohort exposed to amosite (Paterson, NJ, insulation manufacturers, Seidman et al., 1986). 

Although the linear EPA model generally provided a good description of exposure response for lung cancer, Asbestos Cancer in some cases it did so only by estimating a large background risk relative to the comparison population. Some of these relative risks seem too large to be due to differences in smoking rates and are probably due at least in part to errors in exposure estimates. 

There was some equivocal evidence that the relative risk decreased with increasing time since last exposure in the Wittenoom cohort, Asbestos Cancer but none either in the South Carolina cohort up to 50 years from last exposure or in the New Jersey cohort up to 35 years from last exposure. 

The mesothelioma model provided good descriptions of the observed patterns of mortality after exposure ends, Asbestos Cancer with no evidence that risk increases with long times since last exposure at rates that vary from that predicted by the model (i.e., with the square of time). 

In particular, the model adequately described the mortality rate in Quebec chrysotile miners and Asbestos Cancer millers up through >50 years from last exposure. There was statistically significant evidence in both the Wittenoom and Quebec cohorts that the exposure intensity-response is supralinear(1) rather than linear. 

The best-fitting models predicted that the mortality rate varies as [intensity](0.47) for Wittenoom and Asbestos Cancer as [intensity](0.19) for Quebec and, in both cases, the exponent was significantly less than 1 (p< .0001). 

Using the EPA models, K(L)'s and K(M)'s were estimated from the three sets of raw data and also from published data covering a broader range of environments than those originally addressed in the EPA 1986 update. Uncertainty in these estimates was quantified using "uncertainty bounds" that reflect both statistical and Asbestos Cancer nonstatistical uncertainties. 

Lung cancer potency factors (K(L)'s) were developed from 20 studies from 18 locations, Asbestos Cancer compared to 13 locations covered in the EPA 1986 update. Mesothelioma potency factors (K(M)'s) were developed for 12 locations compared to four locations in the EPA 1986 update. 

Although the 4 locations used to calculate K(M) in the EPA 1986 update include one location with exposures to amosite and three with exposures to mixed fiber types, the 14 K(M)'s derived in the present analysis also include 6 locations in which exposures were predominantly to chrysotile and Asbestos Cancer 1 where exposures were only to crocidolite. 

The K(M)'s showed evidence of a trend, with lowest K(M)'s obtained from cohorts exposed predominantly to chrysotile and highest K(M)'s from cohorts exposed only to amphibole asbestos , Asbestos Cancer with K(M)'s from cohorts exposed to mixed fiber types being intermediate between the K(M)'s obtained from chrysotile and amphibole environments. 

Despite the considerable uncertainty in the K(M) estimates, the K(M) from the Quebec mines and mills was clearly smaller than those from several cohorts exposed to amphibole asbestos or a mixture of amphibole asbestos and Asbestos Cancer chrysotile. 

For lung cancer, although there is some evidence of larger K(L)'s from amphibole asbestos exposure, there is a good deal of dispersion in the data, and Asbestos Cancer one of the largest K(L)'s is from the South Carolina textile mill where exposures were almost exclusively to chrysotile. 

This K(L) is clearly inconsistent with the K(L) obtained from the cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers. The K(L)'s and K(M)'s derived herein are defined in terms of concentrations of airborne fibers measured by phase-contrast microscopy (PCM), which only counts all structures longer than 5 microm, Asbestos Cancer thicker than about 0.25 microm, and with an aspect ratio > or =3:1. 

Moreover, PCM does not distinguish between asbestos and nonasbestos particles. One possible reason for the discrepancies between the K(L)'s and Asbestos Cancer K(M)'s from different studies is that the category of structures included in PCM counts does not correspond closely to biological activity. 

In the accompanying article (Berman and Crump, 2008) the K(L)'s and Asbestos Cancer K(M)'s and related uncertainty bounds obtained in this article are paired with fiber size distributions from the literature obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). 

The resulting database is used to define K(L)'s and K(M)'s that depend on both the size (e.g., length and width) and Asbestos Cancer mineralogical type (e.g., chrysotile or crocidolite) of an asbestos structure. 

An analysis is conducted to determine how well different K(L) and Asbestos Cancer K(M) definitions are able to reconcile the discrepancies observed herein among values obtained from different environments.

Tree Removal From Thunderstorms

The Inyo National Forest, Mammoth Ranger District is soliciting comments on a proposed project to remove wind-fallen trees from Reds Meadow Valley. On November 30 of last year an extreme wind event caused large numbers of trees to be blown down Wind Damage Tree Removal From Thunderstorms in the Reds Meadow Valley. 
<  read more..

How To Remove Smoke Odor

Identification and Preparation of Cleaner Air Shelters for Protection of the Public from Wildfire Smoke 1. Identify one or more facilities with tight-sealing windows and doors and public access (for example, public schools, fire stations, or hospitals). As a rule of thumb, Odor Control How To Remove Smoke Odor newer build  read more..

How To Remove Residential Lead Paint

Lead test kits are products sold to consumers for use in detecting the presence of lead.Historically, test kits have been developed to detect lead-based paint as defined by the "Lead Safe Housing Rule," (24 C.F.R. Part 35). Under this rule, administered by the Department of Housing and Urban Develop  read more..

Where Do Hurricane Come From

Charlotte Harbor, Florida Hurricane Charley came to Charlotte Harbor one Friday, with winds up to 114 mph, leaving the community stunned. Buildings were destroyed, and streets were filled with debris and downed power lines. While the storm was swirling through town, Wind Damage Where Do Hurricane Come From  30 newspaper  read more..

Methods To Restore Lost Documents

Materials that are durable and chemically stable should be used throughout the binding process. Of greatest concern are the endpapers, Document restoration Methods To Restore Lost Documents which come in direct contact with the first and last pages of the book. Endpapers should be alkaline and meet ANSI Standard Z-39.48-1992.

Ask th  read more..

Naturally Remove Smoke After A Fire

During a fire, soot agglomerations are segregated in the air due to flotation effects, the larger agglomerations dropping out of the air closest to the fire and the finer agglomerations farther from the fire. Soot particles will penetrate the finest crevices of a surface and remain physically trappe  read more..

What Are Tsunamis

Introduction The [state] Geological Survey (CGS) provides geologic and seismic expertise to the public, other State government offices, such as the Governor's Office of Emergency Services (OES), and local government agencies (cities and counties). With the December 26, 2004 magnitude 9.0 earthquake   read more..

Dehumidification

After your building or house has sustained a fire and the fire department has left, leaving your place a soggy smelly mess, now you must face the task of cleaning the Electronic Restoration Dehumidification. The whole purpose of drying your water damaged electronic equipment is to reduce the amount of time the electronics spen  read more..

How To Keep A Mold Smell Out Of The Crawlspace

The principal perceived advantage of a vented crawl space over an unvented one is that venting may limit radon and moisture-related decay hazards by diluting the crawl space air. Crawl Space Drying How To Keep A Mold Smell Out Of The Crawlspace Additionally, providing a vented crawlspace may make sense in flood-prone areas such as coastal zones subj  read more..

Remove Lead Paint From Your Business

Employers shall institute a medical surveillance program for all employees who are or may be exposed at or above the action level for more than 30 days per year. (B) The employer shall assure that all medical examinations and procedures are performed by or under the Lead Paint Removal Remove Lead Paint From Your Business supervision of a l  read more..