Radon Mitigation >> About Radon

You want to take good care of your family. You try to eat healthy foods. You take your children to the doctor for regular checkups. You try your best to protect your family from accidents and illness. You want to live in a safe neighborhood and home. But did you know your home might have hidden About Radon dangers to your children's health? 

Ask yourself: About Radon Is the air in your home clean and healthy? Do your children have breathing problems, like asthma? Is someone in your home allergic to mold? Do you know the signs of carbon monoxide poisoning? Is there lead anywhere in your home? Is your tap water safe to drink? Do you have household products with chemicals in them that can make you sick? 

 Do you use bug spray or other products to keep away pests? Do you keep poisons where your children can reach them? The answers to questions like these will help you learn if your home is safe and healthy. This About Radon booklet will make it easier to answer these and other important questions about your home and how you live in it. 

It will also give you About Radon ideas about how to protect your children's health. It is up to you to make sure your home is a healthy home, but there are lots of places to go for help. The air inside can be more harmful to your family's health than the air outdoors. Air can be unhealthy if it has too many pollutants. Indoor air pollutants can be lots of things—from oven cleaner to cigarette smoke to mold. It is not always easy to tell if your home has unhealthy air. 

You may notice bad smells or see smoke, but you cannot see or smell other dangers, like carbon monoxide or radon. This chapter will help you learn if your home has healthy air. Radon is another gas. It can get into some homes from the ground below them. You cannot see, taste, About Radon or smell radon. Radon is found all over the United States. 

Radon can cause lung cancer. In fact, it is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. If you smoke About Radon and your home has high levels of radon, your risk of lung cancer is especially high. Have you ever tested your home for radon? Do any of your neighbors have problems with radon gas? If so, you might also have a radon problem. 

Radon is a radioactive gas that cannot be seen, smelled or tasted. Radon gas is a natural substance that can be found in the dirt and rocks beneath houses, in well water and About Radon in some building materials. It can enter homes through soil, crawlspaces, foundation cracks, floors and walls. Once inside, it can sometimes become trapped in your home. 

All homes have some radon gas. Breathing high levels of radon can put you at risk for lung cancer. To see if your house has dangerous levels of radon, you should test it. Radon is measured in picoCuries per liter of air (pCi/L). Radon levels inside houses below 4 pCi/L are considered acceptable. If your home has radon levels above 4 pCi/L, About Radon you should take action. 

What can you do? Test your home: Use a 2-day test kit or 90-day test kit (90-day test kits take longer but the results are more accurate). Follow About Radon test kit instructions closely. You may also hire a professional to test for radon for you (Contact your state's radon office for a list of qualified testers). Fix your home if you have unacceptable levels of radon: 

Hire a professional contractor. Contact your state's radon office for guidance and About Radon assistance if you are thinking about fixing your radon problem yourself. Re-test your home after repairs to make sure the problem was fixed. Follow these additional tips: Do not smoke in your house. Smoking increases the risk of lung cancer from radon. 

Keep your home ventilated by opening windows and using fans and vents to circulate air. (This will only temporarily reduce radon levels.) Seal cracks in floors and wall with plaster, caulk About Radon or other crack sealants. You can cover the earth floor in crawl spaces with a high-density plastic sheet. A vent pipe and fan can be used to blow the radon from under the sheet and vent it to the outdoors  

Just over a year and a half since the release of the Federal Radon Action Plan (June 2011) the federal partners have released an About Radon accomplishments report highlighting significant progress made. More than half of the 33 commitments in the Action Plan have been completed and over a dozen more are on track to completion.  

Moving forward, federal partners are focused on maintaining momentum and increasing impacts. To achieve this, they will not only broaden the scope of their work, but will also be calling upon industry and nonprofit organizations to build on, leverage About Radon and amplify the impact of federal agency actions. For over a year, the federal partners have been working to implement the Plan. 

While work continues on the Plan the federal government wants to keep the public informed about progress. Thus, the federal partners have released a Federal Radon Action Plan Scorecard, About Radon a tool designed to display the status of federal activity. This scorecard shows the status on each commitment identified in the Action Plan and provides a target completion date. 

You can view progress in three different ways: The Action Plan aims to increase radon risk reduction in homes, schools and daycare facilities, About Radon as well as radon-resistant new construction. It contains both an array of current federal government actions to reduce radon risks and a series of new commitments for future action. 

To address the current reality of barriers to radon risk reduction the actions implemented through this effort will: Demonstrate the importance, About Radon feasibility, and value of radon testing and mitigation. Provide economic incentives to encourage those who have sufficient resources to test and mitigate, and provide direct support to reduce the risk for those who lack sufficient resources. Build demand for services from the professional, nationwide radon services industry.

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Remove Radon From A House

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By preparing for the next flood,you regain control over your future —a guaranteed way to reduce your level of anxiety and stress. You don't have to wait for the government to act; you can take care of protecting your home when you are ready. Flood Damage Prevent Flood Waters From Entering

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