Asbestos Abatement >> Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps

As the flooding recedes, communities are moving from the more immediate emergency response to longer term cleanup and recovery. The Department has updated this section of its guidance to reflect the changing nature of the disaster response, and Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps to clarify questions we have received regarding building debris that has the potential to contain asbestos. 

This guidance only applies to state protocols. This guidance does not alter any federal requirements (e.g., EPA, OSHA) that may also apply with respect to debris cleanup and Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps worker safety. Please contact the appropriate federal agencies if you have questions regarding the applicability of their regulations. 

For the purposes of this section on Asbestos, the following definitions apply: Tier 1 Building Materials: Any and all building materials that have been displaced or Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps dislodged as a result of the heavy rains and flooding. This includes, for example debris from demolished homes that may have washed away. 

Tier 2 Building Materials: All other building materials not defined in Tier 1. This includes, for example, building materials from comparatively lesser damaged homes, Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps such as drywall in a flooded basement. Trigger levels for single family residential dwellings are 50 linear feet on pipes, 32 square feet on other surfaces or the volume equivalent of a 55-gallon drum. 

Trigger levels for public and Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps commercial buildings are 260 linear feet on pipes, 160 square feet on other surfaces or the volume equivalent of a 55-gallon drum. Tier 1 Building Materials Handling Procedures 

If asbestos-containing materials are known to be present in flood debris in amounts greater than regulatory trigger levels, Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps they must be removed in accordance with Colorado Air Quality Control Commission Regulation No. 8, Part B. 

If it is not known if asbestos is present in the building materials, any wet material may be handled as non-asbestos flood debris and Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps disposed of at a permitted landfill. Dry building materials should be wetted and then may be handled as above. A state-issued demolition permit is not required to remove the debris from buildings that have been partially or completely destroyed. 

However, flood debris may contain unknown substances, including chemicals. People should take care when handling any materials from buildings that either are partially damaged by the floods (i.e., salvageable building materials remaining) or Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps completely destroyed (i.e., only debris remains). 

All debris should be handled in a manner that will minimize potential exposure to both the people handling the material and those in the surrounding area. The heavy rains and flooding will presumably have resulted in debris that is thoroughly wetted, Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps which should minimize dust and related potential risks from airborne materials during cleanup (including, potentially, asbestos fibers). 

Any material that has dried out should be thoroughly wetted to minimize dust release. The Department will not require flood soaked or Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps thoroughly wetted materials transported for immediate disposal at the landfills to be wrapped with plastic. 

Roll-offs and trucks need to be covered to prevent: 1) the materials from drying out and 2) the material from blowing out of the vehicles between the point of pick-up and disposal. If the material is thoroughly wetted from flood waters/mud, Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps then potential airborne contaminants should be sufficiently contained for short haul and immediate disposal purposes. 

In addition, handling flood soaked and muddy materials is hard enough; adding plastic wrapping could increase personal injury risk and hamper timely and effective cleanup. The risks from potential asbestos fibers and Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps other airborne contaminants could increase as the debris dries out. 

If the material is not thoroughly wetted, then the materials should either be thoroughly wetted or, if that is not possible, Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps the debris should be packaged inside a 6-mil plastic sheeting liner. This is done to contain the debris as it is transported from the site to the landfill. Metal debris must be washed clean of mud/debris prior to recycling. 

Concrete debris (foundations) removed from a site must be disposed of at an approved landfill. If you wish to recycle this material, Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps it must be inspected by a certified asbestos building inspector and found to be free of asbestos containing materials prior to recycling. Tier 2 Building Materials Handling Procedures 

NOTE: Homeowners doing their own work in their primary residences are exempt from the Tier 2 requirements. However, Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps homeowners must dispose of asbestos-containing debris in accordance with applicable regulations. All Tier 2 suspect building materials in amounts greater than the trigger levels must be sampled for the presence of asbestos in accordance with Regulations.  

If asbestos-containing materials are present in amounts greater than the trigger levels, and are going to be removed or impacted by renovation or demolition activities, Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps those activities must be done in accordance with the Major Spill Response section (III.T.) of Regulation No. 8, Part B. 

In order to further facilitate the timely and protective cleanup of confirmed asbestos containing materials from this natural disaster, Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps the Department is providing relief from the following regulatory requirements until further notice: 

For sampling: The Colorado individual Building Inspector certification requirement is waived, Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps so long as the individual’s AHERA training is current. The requirement for a Building Inspector to work for a Registered Asbestos Consulting firm is waived. 

The requirement for a laboratory to be registered in Colorado to conduct bulk sample analysis is waived, but the requirement for the laboratory to be NVLAP-accredited is not waived. For asbestos spill response requirements: Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps Immediate notification to the division by telephone is waived. The 10-day waiting period to begin an abatement project is waived. 

The Colorado individual Worker and Supervisor certification requirements are waived, so long as the individual’s AHERA training is current. The requirement for an abatement company to obtain Colorado certification is waived. Lists of and Asbestos Disposal And Flood Zone Maps contact information for landfills that will accept Tier 2 material can be found on the Air Pollution Control Division’s Asbestos Program

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