Asbestos Abatement >> Friable Asbestos

How are Friable Asbestos-related diseases detected? Individuals who have been exposed (or suspect they have been exposed) to friable asbestos fibers on the job, through the environment, or at home via a family contact should inform their doctor about their exposure history and whether or not they experience any symptoms. 

The symptoms of Friable Asbestos-related diseases may not become apparent for many decades after the exposure. It is particularly important to check with a doctor if any of the following symptoms develop (6): Shortness of breath, wheezing, or hoarseness. A persistent cough that gets worse over time. Blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up from the lungs. Pain or tightening in the chest. 

Difficulty swallowing. Swelling of the neck or face. Loss of appetite. Weight loss. Fatigue or anemia. A thorough physical examination, including a chest x-ray and lung function tests, may be recommended. The chest x-ray is currently the most common tool used to detect Friable Asbestos-related diseases. 

However, it is important to note that chest x-rays cannot detect friable asbestos fibers in the lungs, but they can help identify any early signs of lung disease resulting from Friable Asbestos exposure (2). 

Studies have shown that computed tomography (CT) (a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body taken from different angles; Friable Asbestos the pictures are created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine) may be more effective than conventional chest x-rays at detecting friable asbestos-related lung abnormalities in individuals who have been exposed to friable asbestos (12). 

A lung biopsy, which detects microscopic friable asbestos fibers in pieces of lung tissue removed by surgery, is the most reliable test to confirm the presence of friable asbestos-related abnormalities. A bronchoscopy is a less invasive test than a biopsy and Friable Asbestos detects friable asbestos fibers in material that is rinsed out of the lungs. 

It is important to note that these tests cannot determine how much friable asbestos an individual may have been exposed to or whether disease will develop (12). Friable asbestos fibers can also be detected in urine, mucus, or feces, Friable Asbestos but these tests are not reliable for determining how much friable asbestos may be in an individual’s lungs (2). 

How can workers protect themselves from friable asbestos exposure? The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a component of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and is the Federal agency responsible for health and safety regulations in maritime, construction, manufacturing, and Friable Asbestos service workplaces. 

OSHA established regulations dealing with friable asbestos exposure on the job, specifically in construction work, shipyards, and Friable Asbestos general industry, that employers are required to follow. In addition, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), another component of the DOL, enforces regulations related to mine safety. 

Workers should use all protective equipment provided by their employers and follow recommended workplace practices and Friable Asbestos safety procedures. For example, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved respirators that fit properly should be worn by workers when required. 

Workers who are concerned about friable asbestos exposure in the workplace should discuss the situation with other employees, their employee health and safety representative, and their Friable Asbestos employers. If necessary, OSHA can provide more information or make an inspection. 

Regional offices of OSHA are listed in the "United States Government” section of a telephone directory’s blue pages (under "Department of Labor”). Information about Friable Asbestos regional offices can also be found on OSHA’s website. 

More information about Friable Asbestos is available on OSHA’s Friable asbestos page, which has links to information about friable asbestos in the workplace, including what OSHA standards apply, the hazards of friable asbestos, evaluating friable asbestos exposure, and controls used to protect workers. OSHA’s national office can be contacted at: 

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is another Federal agency that is concerned with Friable Asbestos exposure in the workplace. 

NIOSH conducts friable asbestos-related research, evaluates work sites for possible health hazards, and makes exposure control recommendations. In addition, NIOSH distributes publications on the health effects of friable asbestos exposure and Friable Asbestos can suggest additional sources of information. NIOSH can be contacted at:

Trauma Scene Management Biohazard Remediation

Law enforcement officers and correctional officers may face a number of situations where there is occupational exposure to blood and other potentially infectious materials. In its publication "Guidelines for Prevention of  Crime Scene Cleanup Trauma Scene Management Biohazard Remediation Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus   read more..

Fema Flood Zones And Debris Disposal

Household Chemicals (i.e., Household Hazardous Waste (HHW)) can be taken to a county or municipal HHW facility for recycling or potentially reuse. Check with your local environmental health representative to see if a temporary HHW collection site has been established. If HHW cannot safely be removed  read more..

How Tenants Should Cleanup After Pets

Landlord to supply possession of the dwelling unit.(a) At the commencement of the term the landlord shall deliver possession of the premises to thetenant in compliance with the rental agreement and AS 34.03.100 . The landlord may, Tenant Move Out Cleanup How Tenants Should Cleanup After Pets after serving a notice toquit under AS 09.45.100 - 09.  read more..

Lead Abatement Methods

If blood lead level has substantially declined during the period of removal. From September 8, 1979 to September 8, 1980, the blood lead level requiring employee medical removal is 80 µg/100 g. Workers found to have a confirmed blood lead level at or above this value need only be removed fro  read more..

How To Clean Soot From Kitchen Cabinets

Fires can rearrange and damage natural walkways, as well as sidewalks, parking lots, roads, Fire Damage How To Clean Soot From Kitchen Cabinets and buildings. Never assume that fire-damaged structures or ground are stable. Buildings that have been burned may have suffered structural damage and could be dangerous. 

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Dehumidification

Microorganisms, viruses, mold and fungi should be eliminated in the Sewage Cleanup Dehumidification procedure. A sample of a disinfecting agent is ammonia bleach; but, other authorized sanitizing solutions might be used. For sufficient sanitizing the bleach mixture should be one cup of ammonia bleach to one gallon of wa  read more..

Radon Health Risk Information

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, after smoking. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)and the Surgeon General strongly recommend taking further action when the home's radon test results are 4.0 pCi/L or greater. The concentration of radon in the home is measured in Radon Mitigation Radon Health Risk Information   read more..

Flood Damage

Standardization of aeration rate, which took place through unoccupied episodes, active carbon dioxide observed by a Beckman LB-2 Infrared Analyzer, degree of deterioration of a known quantity, generally 1% indicated aeration rate.
Chief Odor Control Flood Damage factors involved three levels of < r *6 ^- 5  read more..

How To Remove Smoke Odor

Identification and Preparation of Cleaner Air Shelters for Protection of the Public from Wildfire Smoke 1. Identify one or more facilities with tight-sealing windows and doors and public access (for example, public schools, fire stations, or hospitals). As a rule of thumb, Smoke Damage How To Remove Smoke Odor newer build  read more..

How To Remove Asbestos From A Roof

Asbestos Requirements for Demolition and Renovation Projects 6/2013 Disclaimer: The statements in this Asbestos Abatement How To Remove Asbestos From A Roof document are intended solely as guidance. This document is not intended, nor can it be relied on, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation.  

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