Asbestos Abatement >> Friable Asbestos

How are Friable Asbestos-related diseases detected? Individuals who have been exposed (or suspect they have been exposed) to friable asbestos fibers on the job, through the environment, or at home via a family contact should inform their doctor about their exposure history and whether or not they experience any symptoms. 

The symptoms of Friable Asbestos-related diseases may not become apparent for many decades after the exposure. It is particularly important to check with a doctor if any of the following symptoms develop (6): Shortness of breath, wheezing, or hoarseness. A persistent cough that gets worse over time. Blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up from the lungs. Pain or tightening in the chest. 

Difficulty swallowing. Swelling of the neck or face. Loss of appetite. Weight loss. Fatigue or anemia. A thorough physical examination, including a chest x-ray and lung function tests, may be recommended. The chest x-ray is currently the most common tool used to detect Friable Asbestos-related diseases. 

However, it is important to note that chest x-rays cannot detect friable asbestos fibers in the lungs, but they can help identify any early signs of lung disease resulting from Friable Asbestos exposure (2). 

Studies have shown that computed tomography (CT) (a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body taken from different angles; Friable Asbestos the pictures are created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine) may be more effective than conventional chest x-rays at detecting friable asbestos-related lung abnormalities in individuals who have been exposed to friable asbestos (12). 

A lung biopsy, which detects microscopic friable asbestos fibers in pieces of lung tissue removed by surgery, is the most reliable test to confirm the presence of friable asbestos-related abnormalities. A bronchoscopy is a less invasive test than a biopsy and Friable Asbestos detects friable asbestos fibers in material that is rinsed out of the lungs. 

It is important to note that these tests cannot determine how much friable asbestos an individual may have been exposed to or whether disease will develop (12). Friable asbestos fibers can also be detected in urine, mucus, or feces, Friable Asbestos but these tests are not reliable for determining how much friable asbestos may be in an individual’s lungs (2). 

How can workers protect themselves from friable asbestos exposure? The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a component of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and is the Federal agency responsible for health and safety regulations in maritime, construction, manufacturing, and Friable Asbestos service workplaces. 

OSHA established regulations dealing with friable asbestos exposure on the job, specifically in construction work, shipyards, and Friable Asbestos general industry, that employers are required to follow. In addition, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), another component of the DOL, enforces regulations related to mine safety. 

Workers should use all protective equipment provided by their employers and follow recommended workplace practices and Friable Asbestos safety procedures. For example, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved respirators that fit properly should be worn by workers when required. 

Workers who are concerned about friable asbestos exposure in the workplace should discuss the situation with other employees, their employee health and safety representative, and their Friable Asbestos employers. If necessary, OSHA can provide more information or make an inspection. 

Regional offices of OSHA are listed in the "United States Government” section of a telephone directory’s blue pages (under "Department of Labor”). Information about Friable Asbestos regional offices can also be found on OSHA’s website. 

More information about Friable Asbestos is available on OSHA’s Friable asbestos page, which has links to information about friable asbestos in the workplace, including what OSHA standards apply, the hazards of friable asbestos, evaluating friable asbestos exposure, and controls used to protect workers. OSHA’s national office can be contacted at: 

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is another Federal agency that is concerned with Friable Asbestos exposure in the workplace. 

NIOSH conducts friable asbestos-related research, evaluates work sites for possible health hazards, and makes exposure control recommendations. In addition, NIOSH distributes publications on the health effects of friable asbestos exposure and Friable Asbestos can suggest additional sources of information. NIOSH can be contacted at:

How Long Should A Dehumidifier Run Per Day

Unit(s) shall be capable and designed for year-round, 24-hours-a-day operation; and requiring only connections of ducts, utilities, and remote sensors, controllers, Dehumidification How Long Should A Dehumidifier Run Per Day and monitors. 3. Unit(s) shall include active regeneration system for control of dehumidification processes.    read more..

Sewer Smell In My Basement Apartment

What is sewer gas?Sewer gas is a complex mixture of toxic and nontoxic gases which collect in the sewage system at varying levels depending on the source. Sewer gas is formed during the decay of household and industrial waste. Highly toxic components of sewer gas include hydrogen sulfide and ammonia  read more..

How To Remove Lead Paint From Walls

Nine test kits (both chemical types) were used to test for the presence or absence of lead in a set of six alkyd oil-based paint standards prepared by CPSC's Directorate for Laboratory Sciences, Division of Chemistry (LSC) staff (at lead concentrations of 0.0 percent, 0.06 percent,0.10 percent, 0.50  read more..

Radon Mitigation

Turns out that your tenant works at the local nuclear power plant, one day when they are at work they decide to test themselves for radiation. The radiation levels go off the charts, and they determine that the radiation is coming from your rental house, so they want a Tenant Move Out Cleanup Radon Mitigation.  Radon is a color  read more..

How To Survive A Hurricane

Foundations are at relatively low risk from wind forces, but are at higher risks from water forces in wave erosion zones and flood zones. In flooding and wave erosion zones, Wind Damage How To Survive A Hurricane homes are typically elevated above base flood elevation (BFE), defined as the elevation having a 1% chance of b  read more..

Flooding Garbage Cleanup

Recommendation #8: Modify disaster assistance employee deployment processes to ensure that Incident Management Assistance Teams and Flood Damage Flooding Garbage Cleanup other FEMA first responders include one or more debris specialists with the experience and managementskills to assist communities in the crucial early st  read more..

Lead Paint Removal From A Public Building

"Public building" means a structure which is generally accessible to the public, including but not limited to, schools, daycare centers, museums, airports, hospitals, stores, convention centers, government facilities, office buildings and any other building which is not an industrial building or&nbs  read more..

What Is Radon

What is what is radon? What is radon is a radioactive gas released from the normal decay of the elements uranium, thorium, and radium in rocks and soil. It is an invisible, odorless, tasteless gas that seeps up through the ground and diffuses into the air. In a few areas, depending on local geology,  read more..

Tsunamis

Tsunamis Tsunamis (pronounced soo-n¡-mees), also known as seismic sea waves (mistakenly called "tidal waves"), are a series of enormous waves created by an underwater disturbance such as an earthquake, landslide, volcanic eruption, Flood Damage Tsunamis or meteorite.

A tsunami can move hundreds of m  read more..

How To Dispose Of Lead Paint Chips

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Air Pollution Control Division is responsible for developing and implementing lead certification and abatement regulations for child occupied facilities and target housing, as mandated by state statute (25-5-1101 C.R.S., et seq.). The statute  read more..