Asbestos Abatement >> Asbestos In Homes

What programs are available to help individuals with asbestos in homes-related diseases? Some people with Asbestos In Homes-related illness may be eligible for Medicare coverage. Information about benefits is available from Medicare’s Regional Offices, located in 10 major cities across the United States and serving specific geographic areas. 

The Regional Offices serve as the agency’s initial point of contact for beneficiaries, health care providers, state and local governments, and Asbestos In Homes the general public. General information about Medicare is available by calling toll-free 1–800–633–4227 (1–800–MEDICARE) or by visiting the Medicare website. 

People with occupational Asbestos In Homes-related diseases also may qualify for financial help, including medical payments, under state workers’ compensation laws. Because eligibility requirements vary from state to state, workers employed by private companies or by state and local government agencies should contact their state workers’ compensation board. 

Contact information for state workers’ compensation officials may be found in the blue pages of a local telephone directory or Asbestos In Homes on the DOL website. 

If exposure occurred during employment with a Federal agency, Asbestos In Homes medical expenses and other compensation may be covered by the Federal Employees’ Compensation Program, which is administered by the DOL, Employment Standards Administration’s Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs. 

This program provides workers’ compensation benefits to Federal (civilian) employees for employment-related injuries and diseases. Benefits include wage replacement, payment for medical care, and, where necessary, Asbestos In Homes medical and vocational rehabilitation assistance in returning to work. 

Benefits may also be provided to dependents if the injury or Asbestos In Homes disease causes the employee’s death. 

The program has 12 district offices nationwide. In addition, the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Program provides benefits to longshoremen, harbor workers, other maritime workers, and Asbestos In Homes other classes of private industry workers who are injured during the course of employment or suffer from diseases caused or worsened by conditions of employment. 

Information about eligibility and how to file a claim for benefits under either of these programs is available from: Eligible veterans may receive health care at a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center for an Asbestos In Homes-related disease. Veterans can receive treatment for service-connected and nonservice-connected medical conditions. 

Is there Federal legislation to help victims of asbestos in homes-related diseases? No Federal legislation has been enacted to compensate victims of asbestos in homes-related diseases or Asbestos In Homes to protect people from asbestos in homes exposure. 

However, a bill called the Fairness in Asbestos in homes Injury Resolution Act, or FAIR Act, has been introduced in Congress several times. This bill would create a national trust fund to compensate victims suffering from Asbestos In Homes-related diseases. 

The proposed trust fund would be administered by the DOL, Asbestos In Homes outside of the courts, through a claims process in which all individuals with certain medical symptoms and evidence of asbestos in homes-related disease would be compensated. 

Funding for the trust would come from insurance companies and companies that mined, manufactured, and sold asbestos in homes or asbestos in homes products. Under the bill, Asbestos In Homes individuals affected by asbestos in homes exposure would no longer be able to pursue awards for damages in any Federal or state court. 

What other organizations offer information related to asbestos in homes exposure? The organizations listed below can provide more information about asbestos in homes exposure. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Asbestos In Homes Disease Registry (ATSDR) is the principal Federal agency responsible for evaluating the human health effects of exposure to hazardous substances. 

This agency works in close collaboration with local, state, and other Federal agencies, with tribal governments, and with communities and Asbestos In Homes local health care providers to help prevent or reduce harmful human health effects from exposure to hazardous substances. 

The ATSDR provides information about asbestos in homes and where to find occupational and Asbestos In Homes environmental health clinics. The ATSDR can be contacted at: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates the general public’s exposure to asbestos in homes in buildings, drinking water, and the environment. 

The EPA offers a Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Hotline and an Asbestos in homes Ombudsman. The TSCA Hotline provides technical assistance and information about asbestos in homes programs implemented under the TSCA, Asbestos In Homes which include the Asbestos in homes School Hazard Abatement Act and the Asbestos in homes Hazard Emergency Response Act. 

The Asbestos in homes Ombudsman focuses on asbestos in homes in schools and handles questions and complaints. Both the TSCA Hotline and the Asbestos in homes Ombudsman can provide publications on a number of topics, particularly on controlling Asbestos In Homes exposure in schools and other buildings. The Ombudsman operates a toll-free hotline for small businesses, trade associations, and others seeking free, confidential help.

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